Would you buy an outfit for someone you’ve never met?

Of course not. You’d likely miss the mark, buying a men’s romper when they prefer a skinny suit or a size XL dress when they wear a petite small. In the end, the design outside wouldn’t fit the personality inside.

The same thing happens when a marketing team jumps right into the visual design of a project and expect to drop in the message later.

And just like the outfit, this approach to creative work won’t result in the best fit for you or your client.

Let’s explore two examples.

“MCON is for people who give a damn about social change and are ready to take action.”

When the Achieve team began to think about branding for MCON, the premier conference for social movements, we spent the most time on developing the messaging first.

Why? We wanted to make sure our audience knew two things: MCON is the biggest, baddest conference for people who want social change, and it’ll never be your normal, stuffy, we’ll-talk-at-you experience. That’s how we came up with “MCON is for people who give a damn about social change and are ready to take action.”

If we’d started with our designers, they undoubtedly would’ve created web and promotional graphics that would catch your eye. (They’re very good.) But with the words “people who give a damn” and “ready to take action” as clues, they were able to hone in on the personality we wanted to convey and attract: People who don’t wait for permission or take no for an answer. People who are doing rather than talking. Innovators. Activists.

Pictures speak a thousand words, it’s said … but you want potential supporters to know exactly what you’re saying and what action you want them to take.

 

In fundraising campaigns, powerful visuals can help drive donor behavior by enhancing an emotionally compelling message. One of Achieve’s clients, Big Dog Ranch Rescue, saves dogs from being euthanized at animal shelters (they’re called last-day dogs) and had a goal of raising $50,000. Visuals for a fundraising campaign seemed a no-brainer! What’s better than cute puppies and doleful dogs staring into the camera?

However, we’d already determined that the client needed to communicate a clear message and a strong call to action. So we started with copy. We told the story of how a donor could save a dog’s life with a $100 gift, and “Save 500 Last-Day Dogs in 30 Days” became the theme and call to action.

Only then did we determine visuals. No sad, desperate animals here: Our photos were of happy dogs and puppies enjoying (perhaps their last day of) life.

The story and visuals were used in a multichannel campaign that resonated with donors – exceeding the client’s Great Give 2016 fundraising total by $175,000 and its #GivingTuesday total by another $150,000. (Read and watch how this story unfolded.)

 

Design before copy can inhibit or limit a copywriter’s creative thinking. Writing the copy first can set a talented designer’s brain on fire with ideas. Best of all, when writers and designers are allowed to work together without the constraints of clients or managers inexperienced in writing and design, they can produce work that astounds, inspires, moves – and leads to achieving your goals.